google
How Will Google Overcome Stadia’s Biggest Obstacle?

The problem with a gaming platform that relies entirely on the internet is that it relies on the internet. Stadia, Google’s new streaming game platform, will require that users have a robust internet connection to work, and that’s a big problem. “It’s what has plagued game streaming from the beginning,” said Pat Moorhead, Principal Analyst at Moor Insights & Strategy. A game streaming service simply can’t work if there’s lag. And in America, there’s a lot of lag. Read More >>

gaming
Ray Tracing Is Coming to a Whole Lot of GPUs

If you thought ray tracing was only going to be possible on Nvidia’s pricey line of Turing GPUs you would be wrong. Today the company has announced ray tracing support for a wide range of GPUs ranging from the Nvidia GTX 1060 all the way up to the super beefy Titan V. The 1060 can notably be found for as little as £200 and its price is expected to drop even further. Read More >>

gaming
All the Detail About Stadia, Google’s Huge Bet on the Future of Gaming

Google is taking on the big guys. In a keynote at Game Developers Conference in San Francisco today Google announced a new service, Stadia, that will allow gamers to play the biggest games on any Android or Chrome-based device (including any device with a Chrome browser). Read More >>

gaming
This 65-Inch PC Gaming Monitor Burned My Eyes in the Good Way

You’ve sat too close to the TV. Or to the screen at the cinema. Everything warps when you get up close. People become giants. The screen seems to go on forever. Everything takes on that 8-bit video game look as you can see the sharp outline of each pixel. But have you ever sat too close to a computer monitor? Can you remember a time you put your nose to that screen and felt like it was too close—too much? If you answer is “no,” might I interest you in the HP Omen X Emperium 65? It’s 65 beautiful inches of display that HP thinks gamers will happily drop £3,500 for. It is at once far, far too much screen for a mere computer, and it is gluttonously just enough. Read More >>

laptops
Dell XPS 13 Review: This Time It’s Practically Perfect

The Dell XPS 13 has been so dangerously close to perfect for so long that the latest iteration left me a little surprised. I was turning it this way and that to find something I could fault it for, not because I wanted to unfairly ding the product, it’s just that nothing is perfect. But Dell has so refined this version of its best 13-inch laptop that the issues with it are all minute and deeply personal. This is a near perfect laptop. Read More >>

augmented reality
You Are Not Ready For HoloLens 2

Microsoft figured it out. Tuesday I got my first opportunity to try out the HoloLens 2, and after slipping it over my head and taking a quick moment to calibrate the eye tracking, I was instantly able to move around the room and interact with objects crafted from light. It was annoyingly natural to participate in an AR world. I saw a helicopter floating over the very real sofa, and when I reached for it, the invisible box it was contained in glowed revealing edges I could simply drag and stretch to make the helicopter larger or smaller. With a pinch and a swish, it twirled around. There was nothing on my hands. No special glove or controller. The HoloLens 2 tracked my fingers and knew exactly what to do. It was a perfect interaction. And in the same short amount of time, it became clear that the average person isn’t getting HoloLens any time soon. Read More >>

gaming
Nintendo Does VR Now, Again

The Nintendo Switch already felt like the best part of a VR experience thanks to the wizardry of the Joy-Con controllers in some games, but now it’s going full VR. Tonight the company announced the Nintendo Labo: VR Kit, an $80 (UK price TBA) Labo kit that lets users build a VR headset out of cardboard. This is the first major foray into VR for the company since the 1995 Virtual Boy. Read More >>

apple
Apple May Finally Add Sleep Tracking to the Apple Watch, Still No Word on Better Battery Life

We’re up to the fourth iteration of Apple’s wearable, and the thing still can’t natively track my sleep. The Fitbit has been doing that almost from the beginning, and Apple has looked a little silly for lacking the feature. However, Bloomberg is reporting that Apple’s finally started testing sleep tracking, and it could appear on an Apple Watch as soon as soon as 2020. Read More >>

cameras
Ricoh Finally Updated Its Cult Favourite Compact Camera, and It’s a Beauty

The Ricoh GR II is a cult favourite—a tiny pocketable point-and-shoot camera with a big APS-C crop sensor and a fine 18.3mm f/2.8 fixed lens. While Sony dominates the point-and-shoot field with its versatile RX100 series, the GR II has been a minimalist alternative built for photographers who want to take a step back from all the gadgetry. The new GR III retains much of what made it appealing before, with a few key improvements that should make shooting in tough conditions a little easier. Read More >>

apple
This Apple Rumour That Refuses to Die Is a Very Good Idea

Yesterday Mark Gurman of Bloomberg reported that sources tell him Apple is planning to create a unified app architecture that works across macOS and iOS, and that it ties into a bid to develop an Apple computer with an Apple-designed CPU inside. Your Apple apps will be cross-platform, and the line between iOS and macOS could blur to the point that it will be difficult to distinguish between the two. You’ve heard this rumour before. And you’re going to keep hearing it, both filtering out of Cupertino, and from Apple fans—because it’s a damn good idea. Read More >>

VR
Human Eye Resolution VR Is a Treat If You Know Where to Look

VR is still in its infancy. It’s at the stage at TVs before colour, or computers before they got personal. It’s easy to forget that because there are so many headsets (and cardboard boxes). But Varjo’s VR-1, a slick looking headset intended for the professionals making the content you’ll one day use, is a great reminder that we’re still in the early days of this technology. This is one of the first VR headsets to provide the super high pixel per inch count your eye can actually enjoy. Read More >>

cameras
Fujifilm’s X-T30 Mirrorless Camera is a Little Fussy, But Absolutely Gorgeous

These days, it seems all you hear about are full-frame mirrorless cameras, with their glorious image sensors about the size of a 35mm film frame. Sony, Canon, and Nikon all seem to have their focus set on the market for high-end full-framers, but with few exceptions, Fujifilm has been steadfast, choosing instead to stick with its line of retro-styled shooters with smaller sensors. The new Fujifilm X-T30, which comes in black, silver, or “charcoal silver” is not lacking for style, its £850 body price is quite attractive. There are, of course, disadvantages. Read More >>

samsung
Now We Know How Much an 8K TV Will Cost (So Much)

Most of the major TV makers were eager to show off their enormous 8K sets in January, but if you were struck with TV envy, you were frustrated because no one at the show was willing to talk about how much over 33 million pixels would cost. But Samsung announced availability and pricing today for its 8K Q900 series—so prepare to spend £15,000 if you want 85 inches of 8K TV. Read More >>

gadgets
I’m Still Searching for a Laptop Bag That Doesn’t Look Terrible

As long as there have been laptops, people have been shoving them in bags. Incredible advances have occurred since that first big honking computer got shoved into a slighter bigger honking bag decades ago. Fabrics have grown more durable, straps more comfortable, and bag design itself has diverted into a wide number of directions. So why do laptop bags still look so awful? Read More >>

reviews
AMD’s Radeon VII Is a Solid Gaming Card, But That’s Just the Beginning

AMD’s fighting competitors on all fronts. It’s battling Intel in the CPU space, with each company advertising more cores and tacking on more features to woo users (and manufacturers) away from the other. Yet its battle against Nvidia in the GPU space is different. While Nvidia comfortably dominates the high-end space, AMD has been content to offer cheaper cards with comparable power in the mid-range and below. The Radeon VII, AMD’s new £700 card—the first 7nm GPU to ship to consumers—is intended to take on Nvidia’s very best cards. What’s surprising is that it isn’t just as good as Nvidia’s best—sometimes it’s better. Read More >>