science
Childhood Antibiotics Could Raise Risk of Mental Illness, Study Finds

For all the good that antibiotics do, relying on them too much can have pretty drastic drawbacks. In particular, their overuse can help create bacterial superbugs resistant to future antibiotics. But a new study published this week in JAMA Psychiatry suggests there’s another, more subtle consequence of antibiotic use, at least in young people: a higher risk of developing serious mental illnesses like obsessive-compulsive disorder and schizophrenia. Read More >>

drugs
Wisdom Tooth Surgery a Gateway to Teen Opioid Addiction, Study Finds

A common rite of passage—having your wisdom teeth pulled—might be raising the risk of teens and young adults becoming addicted to opioids, a new study out Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine suggests. Youngsters who are prescribed opioids by their dentist, often for wisdom tooth extractions, are more likely to abuse opioids within a year’s time than those who don’t get prescribed dental opioids, the study found. Read More >>

pregnancy
In World First, Woman Gives Birth After Receiving Uterus Transplant from Dead Donor

A team of doctors in Brazil have announced a medical first that could someday help countless women unable to have children because of a damaged or absent uterus. In a case report published Tuesday in the Lancet, they claim to have successfully helped a woman give birth using a transplanted uterus from a deceased donor. Read More >>

health
Scientists Propose New Way to Treat Depression With Brain Implants

In recent years, doctors have explored an unorthodox method to address cases of depression that haven’t responded to other treatments: sending precise electrical shocks directly to areas of a patient’s brain, otherwise known as deep brain stimulation (DBS). While the technique has shown some promise, its positive effects tend to be inconsistent. Read More >>

science
The First Male Birth Control Clinical Trial Is Under Way

An elusive medical advance might finally be within grasp, one that could make some couples’ sex lives a lot more convenient. This week, researchers officially kicked off the first wide-scale clinical trial of a male contraceptive topical gel. Read More >>

science
The Current Ebola Outbreak in East Africa has Become the Second Largest in History

The ongoing Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo has reached an especially tragic milestone. According to the World Health Organization, the outbreak is now the second-largest recorded in Ebola’s 42-year-long known history. Read More >>

science
NASA Scientists Find Possibly Infectious Superbugs on Board the ISS

No place is safe from the scourge of superbugs, a new study suggests, not even space. According to the study, samples of bacteria resistant to several antibiotics have been found on the International Space Station (ISS). And while the bacteria may not have made any astronauts sick, the authors say it’s pretty likely that they can. Read More >>

science
A Planned US Study Could Clear The Way for Fewer Dogs Used and Killed in Animal Research

Dogs have been everything we’ve ever needed them to be, including volunteers for clinical trials of drugs meant for both people and pooches. Sadly, these furry test subjects are sometimes euthanised at the end of these experiments, because it’s deemed the only way to get the accurate test results scientists are looking for. But the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is set to start a small—and safe!—study of dogs that might change that way of thinking. Read More >>

science
Brain-Destroying Prions Also Spread Through Victims’ Eyes

One of the strangest things that can sicken us—a rogue misfolded protein that destroys the brain, known as a prion—is even scarier than we knew. Researchers were able to find the prions responsible for sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), the most common prion disease in people, seeded everywhere in the eyes of 11 patients affected by it. Read More >>

science
Over 8 Per Cent of Americans Believe They Are Struggling With Compulsive Sexual Behaviour and Thoughts

Sex and everything that revolves around it can no doubt be stressful and confusing, at least some of the time. But for a decent chunk of Americans, a new survey suggests, their sexual hangups might be causing them a significant amount of mental anguish. Read More >>

climate change
Climate Change Is Going to Make Ragweed Allergies Even Worse, Study Finds

There’s no shortage of horrible things that will become more common in the near future due to climate change, like coastal flooding, extreme weather, and disease-causing ticks, to name a few. But new research published this month in PLOS-One adds another annoyance to the list: Allergy-causing ragweed. Read More >>

science
You Know About Flu Season, but Did You Know About Gonorrhoea Season?

Like clockwork, the influenza virus rears its ugly head every winter and makes our lives miserable. But the flu isn’t the only germ that likes a particular time of year, according to a new paper published this week in PLOS Pathogens. Seemingly every infectious disease, including polio, gonorrhoea, and even HIV, is seasonal, though not always for the same reasons. Read More >>

science
Look How Tightly You Can Squish Mosquitoes Without Killing Them

Far more lethal than sharks, wolves, bears, or any other fanged beast is the tiny mosquito, which holds the title of world’s deadliest animal. The World Health Organization estimates that “millions” of people die every year from mosquito-borne diseases. Thankfully, scientists have come up with a strategy to greatly reduce the mosquito population, but it requires sending tens or even hundreds of thousands of mosquitoes to different areas of the world, often through the mail. Read More >>

science
How Mould Kills

In 1997, doctors from Cleveland reported on a wave of infants in the area who had come down with severe lung bleeding – an illness that might have been caused by so-called toxic black mould. Read More >>

scams
The Quack Medicine Industry Is Getting Millions From Crowdfunding Sites

Another study has found that when well-meaning people donate to crowdfunding campaigns raising money for medical treatments, that cash sometimes ends up in the pockets of people offering useless or even dangerous therapies. Read More >>