science
A Defunct Pregnancy Drug May Still Affect the Grandchildren of Women Who Took It

The ties that bind us to our ancestors might be even more influential than we knew, suggests a new study published Monday in JAMA Pediatrics. It found that the grandchildren of women who took a certain hormone-mimicking drug before the 1970s were at higher risk of developing attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) compared to children whose grandmothers didn’t take the drug. Read More >>

health
The World’s First Drug to Prevent Migraines Has Just Been Approved

On Thursday, the US Food and Drug Administration approved the first drug explicitly developed to prevent migraines. But while the drug may signal a new wave of effective treatments for this debilitating — yet often ignored and dismissed — medical condition, there are still questions as to how many migraine sufferers will actually be able to afford it in the US. Read More >>

health
The Latest Ebola Outbreak Has Reached a Major African City

An ongoing outbreak of Ebola in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) in Africa has become much more worrying, the World Health Organization (WHO) reported today. While previous cases of the often fatal viral disease had been found in rural areas during this most recent outbreak, the first urban case of Ebola was recently confirmed in Mbandaka, a city in the northwestern region of the DRC with 1.2 million residents. Read More >>

animals
Chimp Beds Are Way Less Filthy Than Human Beds

In a twist that rivals cinema’s best, a new study published Tuesday in Royal Society Open Science suggests a horrible truth: we’ve been the damn dirty apes all along. It found that beds made by one of our closest primate relatives, chimpanzees, contain little personal filth, meaning germs and parasites from their own body, and certainly much less filth than what’s typically seen in human homes and beds. Read More >>

memory
Virtual Police Could Be Better at Interviewing Eyewitnesses Than Real Ones, Study Suggests

As many a crime documentary has made clear, eyewitness testimony is often much less accurate than you might think. But a new study published recently in Frontiers in Psychology suggests there could be a relatively simple way to improve witness recollections: Have a virtual avatar do the interviewing instead of a policeman. Read More >>

health
Ebola’s Back Again—Why Don’t we Have a Cure For it Yet?

Ebola has once again resurfaced. On Friday, the World Health Organisation reported that there have been at least 34 suspected cases of the viral disease and 18 deaths since early April in the Bikoro District of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). But Ebola’s resurgence, hardly unexpected, can’t help but bring a question to mind: Why haven’t we found a surefire way to cure or prevent it yet? Read More >>

mental health
Doctors Have an Alarmingly High Suicide Rate, and No One is Sure How to Help Them

Medical doctors are more likely to die from suicide than members of any other profession in the US, suggests new research presented this week at the annual meeting of the American Psychiatric Association. And worse than that, few interventions seem to have helped make these suicides less common. Read More >>

science
Your Coworker’s Outdoor Smoke Break Could Still Contaminate Your Cubicle, Study Finds

Smoking has been banned in public indoor spaces for years now — and for the better — but that doesn’t necessarily mean non-smokers are free from toxic cigarette chemicals. New research published Wednesday in Science Advances suggests that not only can the chemical residue left behind by cigarette smoking find its way into “smoke-free” buildings, but it can then attach itself to aerosol particles suspended in the air that are easily inhaled by our lungs. Read More >>

science
An American Woman’s Years-Long Struggle With a Runny Nose Turned Out to Be Something Way Freakier

A US woman’s constantly runny nose turned out to be lot less innocuous than a typical case of the sniffles. In actuality, her skull had sprung a potentially fatal leak, one that took doctors years to finally spot and thankfully fix. Read More >>

science
Mad Scientists Taught a Predatory Spider to Jump for Them and Now We’re All Probably Doomed

Scientists at the University of Manchester trained a spider named Kim to jump for them, then recorded her leaps on high-speed cameras. But don’t worry, their research—published Tuesday in Scientific Reports—isn’t meant for anything nefarious. Nah, they just want to learn how to build a whole legion of jumping spider-robots. Read More >>

wtf
Doctors Remove 132-Pound Nightmare Tumour From US Woman’s Abdomen

A 38-year-old woman was forced to endure the sort of body horror that would make John Carpenter shudder: An all-consuming, if benign, ovarian tumour that swelled up to 132 pounds. But thankfully, doctors were able to successfully remove the monstrosity with relative ease. Read More >>

health
No, a Study Didn’t Just Prove That Mobile Phones Cause Brain Cancer

Yet another study claiming to show a connection between cancer and mobile phones—this time from the UK—is making the rounds. But plenty of scientists are saying the new paper is misleading. Read More >>

birth control
Birth Control Probably Doesn’t Change Who You’re Attracted to, Study Finds

A commonly touted theory about how women’s attraction to men works might be all wrong, suggests a new paper published this week in Psychological Science. Prior, small experiments have found that birth control pills and ovulation could change a woman’s sexual preferences. Now, a large new study has found that women’s preferences for men’s faces are reliably stable, regardless of whether they’re taking birth control pills or whether they’re ovulating. Read More >>

science
Scientists Find Another Possible Explanation for Why Hair Goes Gray

Scientists think they’ve stumbled upon a newly discovered mechanism that could explain why some people’s hair turns gray and others become afflicted with patches of unpigmented skin, a rare, stigmatized condition called vitiligo. Their research, published Thursday in PLOS Biology, suggests a gene that regulates the natural pigment melanin also keeps our immune system from turning on itself. Read More >>

science
A Lightning Strike Shut off a Woman’s Brain Implant, and It Could Have Been Even Worse

It’s the sort of story that you’d find in a Marvel movie, but with far less cool consequences. Doctors in Slovenia have reported what they say is the first instance of lightning shutting down a person’s brain implant. Read More >>