space
Good News: The Milky Way May Not be Devoured by Andromeda Galaxy After All

The closest galaxy to our own is the majestic Andromeda galaxy: a collection of a trillion stars located a “mere” 2 million light years away. New research suggests that, contrary to previous estimates, this galaxy isn’t much bigger than the Milky Way, and is practically our twin. This means our galaxy won’t be completely consumed when the two galaxies collide in five billion years. Read More >>

science
Secrets of The Cuttlefish’s Uncanny Camouflage Abilities Revealed

Octopus, squid, and cuttlefish can change their skin’s colours, patterns, and textures in ways not seen anywhere else in the animal kingdom. You see what looks to be a clump of seaweed, and then it suddenly springs to life in the form of a retreating cephalopod. The changing of skin texture is a particularly impressive skill—one that marine biologists are now a step closer to understanding. Read More >>

robots
Freaky Flea-Like Robots Could One Day Flip and Tumble Inside Your Body

These tiny, flipping microbots, currently being developed by researchers at Purdue University, could one day deliver drugs directly inside the body. The magnetically propelled bots are no wider than a pinhead. Read More >>

spacex
SpaceX’s Ambitious Internet Satellite Project Is Set to Launch This Weekend

With the inaugural launch of the super-powerful Falcon Heavy rocket now in the books, SpaceX CEO Elon Musk is ready to set his sights on an ambitious project known as Starlink. On Saturday, SpaceX will launch two experimental mini-satellites—the first batch of what Musk hopes will eventually comprise a 4,000-satellite constellation providing low-cost internet around the globe. Read More >>

space
Neptune’s Stinky Dark Vortex is Fading Away Like a Bad Fart

In 2015, the Hubble Space Telescope detected a strange feature in the skies over Neptune—a swirling dark vortex the size of China. Packing copious amounts of hydrogen sulphide—the chemical ingredient that gives farts their awful smell—this storm is not behaving as astronomers predicted, with the latest results suggesting the dark vortex is dying. Read More >>

space
Kepler Astronomers Discover Treasure Trove of New Exoplanets

Kepler is the gift that keeps on giving. After suffering a major malfunction five years ago, the rejiggered space-based telescope continues to churn away, scanning the heavens for signs of distant worlds. An international team of astronomers has now released the results of its latest survey, confirming the existence of nearly 100 new exoplanets. Read More >>

science
Transgender Woman Breastfeeds Her Baby After Experimental Treatment

A medical team from Mount Sinai in New York City is the first to formally report on the details of an experimental therapy that allowed a transgender woman to breastfeed her baby for six weeks. Read More >>

science
These Warlike Ants Rescue Wounded Comrades—and Even Provide Medical Care

Sub-Saharan Matabele ants are ruthless killers, raiding termite mounds two to four times each day. But every once in a while, an ant gets hurt and is hauled back home to recuperate—an astonishing insectoid behaviour unto itself. New research suggests there’s even more to it than that—these ants also administer medical care to those wounded in battle. Read More >>

archaeology
Human Skulls Mounted on Stakes Found at 8,000-Year-Old Burial Site in Sweden

Researchers in Sweden have uncovered evidence of a behaviour never seen before in ancient hunter-gatherers: the mounting of decapitated heads onto stakes. The grim discovery challenges our understanding of European Mesolithic culture and how these early humans handled their dead. Read More >>

archaeology
Amazing Life-Sized Sculptures of Camels and Horses Discovered in Saudi Arabia

Archaeologists in Saudi Arabia have discovered a series of rock reliefs dating back some 2,000 years. The life-sized sculptures show realistic impressions of several animals, though they have been badly damaged by years of erosion and rough treatment by humans. Read More >>

science
Scientists Set to Explore Mysterious Seafloor Exposed by Antarctica’s Giant Iceberg

Remember the massive iceberg that split away from Antarctica last year? An international team of scientists is about to embark on a mission to explore the newly exposed marine ecosystem underneath—one that’s been hidden for over 100,000 years. Read More >>

science
Cautious Optimism as Scientists Grow Human Eggs From Immature Cells in the Lab

In a scientific first, researchers from the UK and US have taken early-stage human egg cells and grown them to full maturity in the lab. It’s an important proof-of-concept that could eventually yield new infertility treatments for women. Read More >>

space
Interstellar Asteroids Like ‘Oumuamua Could Rewrite the Origins of Life on Earth

Late last year, astronomers detected the first known interstellar asteroid, dubbed ‘Oumuamua. New research suggests these exotic objects are more abundant than we thought, an observation that boosts the panspermia hypothesis—the idea that asteroids seeded life on Earth. At the same time, the presence of so many foreign objects in our Solar System could also change the way we search for extraterrestrial life. Read More >>

science
Dino-Killing Asteroid Caused Magma to Burst From the Ocean Floor, Say Scientists

At the end of the Cretaceous era, a large meteorite ploughed into what is now Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula. The collision set off a chain reaction of environmental calamities that likely contributed to the demise of the dinosaurs. New research is now adding to the list of ensuing catastrophes, suggesting the collision cracked our planet’s seafloor like an egg, forcing magma to pour out along the ocean’s tectonic ridges. Read More >>

biology
Swallowed Bombardier Beetles Spew Hot Chemicals From Their Butts to Make Predators Barf

These crafty bombardier beetles are able to escape after being swallowed by toads, which they do by ejecting hot, noxious chemicals that forces the predator to barf. It ain’t pretty, but it works. Read More >>