archaeology
Human Skulls Mounted on Stakes Found at 8,000-Year-Old Burial Site in Sweden

Researchers in Sweden have uncovered evidence of a behaviour never seen before in ancient hunter-gatherers: the mounting of decapitated heads onto stakes. The grim discovery challenges our understanding of European Mesolithic culture and how these early humans handled their dead. Read More >>

archaeology
Amazing Life-Sized Sculptures of Camels and Horses Discovered in Saudi Arabia

Archaeologists in Saudi Arabia have discovered a series of rock reliefs dating back some 2,000 years. The life-sized sculptures show realistic impressions of several animals, though they have been badly damaged by years of erosion and rough treatment by humans. Read More >>

science
Turns Out the First People in England Were Actually Black

A DNA sample from a 10,000-year-old skeleton discovered in Gough Cave near Cheddar Gorge offers a remarkable revelation: the first modern British people had “dark brown to black skin.” According to recent analysis, they also had dark curly hair and blue eyes. In other words, white people in Europe are a much newer thing than we thought. Read More >>

environment
Stupid Truck Driver Drove Right Over the Nazca Lines

There’s a 2,000-year-old archaeological mystery preserved in Southern Peru: enormous images carved into the desert by unknown ancient artists. The beautiful Nazca Lines depict birds, monkeys, and humans, and some of the creations span up to 1,200 feet. And now a man has driven over them with his truck. Read More >>

archaeology
Ancient Grave With Skeletons Arranged in Bizarre Spiral Formation Discovered in Mexico

Mexican archaeologists have discovered a 2,400-year-old burial site in which 10 skeletons were meticulously placed in a circular formation and with their body parts interlocked. The researchers have never seen anything like it, with signs pointing to a previously unknown ritualistic practise. Read More >>

science
Before Our Species Left Africa, Now-Extinct Humans Made These Fancy Tools in India

Archaeologists have discovered sophisticated stone tools in India dating back some 385,000 years. That’s all sorts of incredible, because Homo sapiens like you and me didn’t leave Africa until about 175,000 years ago. The discovery is resetting what we know about so-called “archaic” humans and the dramatic extent to which they spread out from Africa so very long ago. Read More >>

science
Stunning Fossil Discovery Pushes First Human Migration Out of Africa Back 50,000 Years

Archaeologists in Israel have uncovered the partial jawbone from what appears to be a modern human. Dated to between 175,000 to 200,000 years old, the fossil is 50,000 years older than any other human fossil found in the region, suggesting humans left Africa far earlier than previously thought. Read More >>

war
Shipwreck Scavengers Reportedly Dumped Remains of WWII Sailors in Mass Grave

Remember those World War II shipwrecks that mysteriously vanished from the bottom of the Java Sea? When they were found to be missing in 2016, it was heavily suspected that illegal salvagers exploded the ships and then looted them for metal. According to new reports, those metal scavengers also brought up the remains of Dutch and British sailors—and then unceremoniously dumped them into mass graves. Needless to say, officials here and in the Netherlands aren’t happy. Read More >>

history
Dog Walker in Somerset Finds Iron Age Skull

When you're out walking your dog, it's not unusual to come across random items. A lost glove, perhaps. Maybe even a pie. But a skull? Coming across a skull while walking next to the River Sowy in Somerset isn't an ideal situation, but that's what happened to Roger Evans back in March 2017. Read More >>

science
Hundreds of Stone Tools Uncovered at Prehistoric ‘Picnic Spot’

Archaeologists in Israel have uncovered an ancient sweet spot in which early humans flourished some 500,000 years ago. Read More >>

science
Paper Scraps Recovered From Blackbeard’s Cannon Reveal What Pirates Were Reading

Old-timey pirates are typically portrayed as stupid, unrefined thugs whose only interests involved plundering captured ships and forcing enemies to walk the plank. The recent discovery of legible text on paper pulled from the cannon of Blackbeard’s flagship paints a strikingly different picture of these misunderstood sailors. Read More >>

history
Discovery of Unknown Ancient Population Changes Our Understanding of How North America Was Settled

She died 11,500 years ago at the tender age of six weeks in what is now the interior of Alaska. Dubbed “Sunrise Girl-child” by the local indigenous people, the remains of the Ice Age infant—uncovered at an archaeological dig in 2013—contained traces of DNA, allowing scientists to perform a full genomic analysis. Incredibly, this baby girl belonged to a previously unknown population of ancient Native Americans—a discovery that’s changing what we know about the continent’s first people. Read More >>

history
Sunken Australian Submarine From WWI Finally Found After 103 Years

Just six weeks into the First World War, Australian submarine HMAS AE1 disappeared without a trace somewhere off the coast of New Guinea, marking the first time an allied sub had been lost in the conflict. Marine archaeologists have now discovered the historic wreck, ending a mystery that has endured for over a century. Read More >>

science
The Coolest Scientific Discoveries of 2017

Science may be just a tool to help us understand our Universe. But we can all agree that one of its major perks is that leads to the discovery of plenty of really cool, mind-boggling stuff. Read More >>

science
Morbid Experiment Proves This Neolithic Weapon Was an Effective Skull Crusher

Humans have been killing other humans since the dawn of the species, but owing to the poor archaeological record, it’s unclear what sort of weapons our ancestors used to brutalise one another. Using models of human skulls and a replica of a weapon dating back thousands of years, researchers have shown that a bat-like club known as the “Thames Beater” was fit for the task of killing. Read More >>