science
Beetle Trapped in 99-Million-Year-Old Amber Was an Early Pollinator 

Amber fossils containing bugs are nothing new, but the discovery of a beautifully preserved Cretaceous Period beetle with bits of pollen still around it is changing what we know about the planet’s earliest pollinating insects. Read More >>

science
E. Coli Bacteria Made This Image of the Mona Lisa

Scientists created this picture of the Mona Lisa using genetically modified E. coli bacteria. Such teeny little artists! Read More >>

animals
Black Widow Spiders Are Spreading Farther North Through the US than Ever Before

Using photos snapped by citizen scientists, Canadian researchers have documented the northerly spread of black widows into regions not typically known to host these spiders, whose bites can cause severe pain. Read More >>

science
The World’s Fastest Creature Is Not What You Think

When it comes to naming the world’s fastest creature, it’s tempting to think of peregrine falcons, cheetahs, or marlins, but as researchers from Georgia Institute of Technology are apt to point out, we mustn’t forget Spirostomum ambiguum – a worm-like creature that reaches breakneck speeds through rapid shrinkage. Read More >>

science
Here’s How an Absurd Primate Ended Up With Squirrel Teeth

The aye-aye is about as ridiculous looking as a primate can get: beady yellow eyes, bat-like ears, and hands like horrible spiders. But perhaps its most interesting feature is its teeth. Read More >>

science
These Australian Birds Learn About Danger by Listening to Their Friends

If you heard a bear roar for the first time but didn’t see the snarling beast, what would you think? Would you be scared? Maybe, but maybe not—the forest is full of strange noises. But what if, at the same time, one of your friends said, “Holy shit, I know all about that clawed monster and we need to get in the car”? Read More >>

science
How Does Your Self-Control Fare Against Great Tits’?

Great tits appear to have nearly as much self-control as chimpanzees, if a new experiment’s results are accurate. They might even have more self-control than the humans who still make jokes about the name “great tit.” Read More >>

science
Russian Scientists Claim to Have Resurrected 40,000-Year-Old Worms Buried in Ice

A team of Russian scientists is lining themselves up to be the opening cast of a John Carpenter film. Earlier this month, in the journal Doklady Biological Sciences, they announced they had apparently discovered ancient nematode worms that were able to resurrect themselves after spending at least 32,000 years buried in permafrost. The discovery, if legitimate, would represent the longest-surviving return from the cold ever seen in a complex, multi-celled organism, dwarfing even the tardigrade. Read More >>

archaeology
Experts Say Recent ‘Alien’ Mummy Study Was Deeply Flawed and Unethical

Earlier this year, scientists from Stanford University in the US concluded that a strange skeleton known as the Atacama Mummy belonged to a human girl whose physical malformations were the result of several severe genetic mutations. A team of international experts is now questioning these findings, and accusing the scientists of breaching standard research ethics. Read More >>

science
Baby Snake That Lived Among Dinosaurs Found Preserved in Amber

Scientists working in Myanmar have uncovered a nearly 100-million-year-old baby snake encased in amber. Dating back to the Late Cretaceous, it’s the oldest known baby snake in the fossil record, and the first snake known to have lived in a forested environment. Read More >>

science
Adorable New Shark Species Named After Trailblazing Marine Biologist Eugenie Clark

Say hello to Squalus clarkae, otherwise known as Genie’s dogfish. This newly identified species of deepwater shark was named in honour of Eugenie Clark, a scientific pioneer who influenced an entire generation of marine biologists. Read More >>

science
Fur, Feathers, Hair, and Scales May Have the Same Ancient Origin

New research shows that the processes involved in hair, fur, and feather growth are remarkably similar to the way scales grow on fish—a finding that points to a single, ancient origin of these protective coverings. Read More >>

science
Scientist Loses Distinguished Award After Acceptance Presentation Full of Racy Photos

The Herpetologists’ League in the US rescinded its annual Distinguished Herpetologist award after winner Dick Vogt showed racy photos during his acceptance address. Read More >>

science
Crows Are Officially More Badass Than Ravens, Citizen Scientists Report

Crows and ravens are hard to tell apart, but basically, the common raven is bigger than the American and Northwestern crow. So, you might think that ravens would win in a fight. But that doesn’t seem to be the case. Read More >>