crispr
CRISPR Isn’t Just for Gene Editing Anymore

Five years ago, when researchers first discovered that bacterial immune systems could be hijacked to edit DNA in living creatures, it was big news. The technology, called CRISPR, allowed scientists to more easily than ever cut and paste all those As, Cs, Ts, and Gs that make up the base pairs of DNA and encode the world’s living things. With CRISPR, scientists could use genetic engineering to tackle problems from disease to famine. Read More >>

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CRISPR’s Pioneers Find a Way to Use It as a Glowing Virus Detector

CRISPR is at this point well-known for its powerful ability to genetically engineer DNA, but more and more often scientists are turning to CRISPR for other tasks as well. Read More >>

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Scientists Made a ‘Black Box’ for Recording Data From Human Cells

The human body is made up of trillions and trillions cells. And of those trillions of cells, there are hundreds of different types, each with its own specific function, from forming your tissue and organs to reproduction and fighting off infections. They provide structure for the body, take in nutrients, and create energy. Basically, it’s all about the cell. Read More >>

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New Study Calms Fears That CRISPR Could Trigger Unintended Gene Mutations

Last summer, a letter appeared in a scientific journal that challenged how truly “revolutionary” and world-changing CRISPR gene-editing technology really might be. Researchers found that when they used CRISPR to cure blindness in mice, it had resulted in not just a few but more than a thousand unintended effects. Those unintended changes to DNA, they found, were not detectable using common methods for checking for off-target effects. This, the authors wrote, meant that CRISPR needed significant fine-tuning before it was ready to cure disease in people. Stocks tumbled. The scientific community freaked out. Read More >>

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China Has Already Gene-Edited 86 People With CRISPR

While the US's first planned clinical trials of CRISPR gene editing in people are about to kick off. China has been racing ahead, having already used the gene-altering tool to change the DNA of dozens of people in several clinical trials. Read More >>

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The First US Human CRISPR Trials Could Start Any Day Now

The first U.S. human trial using CRISPR to treat disease could kick off any day now. The trials, led by the University of Pennsylvania, will use the gene-editing tool to modify immune cells, prompting them to attack three different types of cancer. Read More >>

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Why CRISPR-Edited Food May Be in US Supermarkets Sooner Than You Think

In September, the U.S. Department of Agriculture gave the green light to a version of the plant Camelina sativa, an important oilseed crop that had been genetically engineered using CRISPR to produce enhanced omega-3 oil. What was interesting about this approval was that the USDA did not ask that the inventors of the plant endure the usual regulatory hoops required to sell biotech crops. The next month, a drought-tolerant soybean variety developed with CRISPR also got a quick pass from the USDA. Read More >>

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Microsoft Wants to Use Artificial Intelligence to Make CRISPR More Accurate

The gene-editing technology CRISPR could very well one day rid the world of its most devastating diseases, allowing us to simply edit away the genetic code responsible for an illness. One of the things standing in the way of turning that fantasy into reality, though, is the problem of off-target effects. Now Microsoft is hoping to use artificial intelligence to fix this problem. Read More >>

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Biotech Stocks Drop After Troubling CRISPR Study, but Gene Editing Is Still the Future

On Monday, the world of science awoke to news that suddenly cast uncomfortable doubt on many of the past five years’ major breakthroughs: A new paper had identified a possible barrier to using the revolutionary gene-editing tool CRISPR-Cas9 in humans. The news incited a temporary hysteria that sent the stocks of all three major CRISPR biotech firms tumbling in premarket trading, declining by as much as 11.9 per cent. Read More >>

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In 2018, We Will CRISPR Human Beings

Ever since 2012, when researchers first discovered that bacterial immune systems could be hijacked to edit DNA in living creatures, CRISPR has been hailed as a maker of revolutions. This was the year that prediction felt like it was starting to come true. US scientists used the CRISPR gene editing technique to treat a common genetic heart disease in a human embryo. Many more diseases were successfully treated in mice using CRISPR. Hell, a particularly enthusiastic biohacker even spontaneously injected himself with muscle-growth genes while giving a talk at a conference. Read More >>

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A Modified CRISPR Could Treat Common Diseases Without Editing DNA

The unassumingly named CRISPR/Cas9 is a technology that stands to remake the world as we know it. By allowing scientists to more easily than ever cut and paste all those As, Cs, Ts, and Gs that encode all the world’s living things, for one thing, it could one day cure many devastating diseases. Read More >>

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Genetically Engineering Yourself Sounds Like a Horrible Idea—But This Guy Is Doing It Anyway

“If something goes wrong, I can just chop off that part of the skin.”
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This Outdated Law Makes CRISPR Illegal in Canada—and That’s Hurting Science

Canada is among the few countries in the world where genetically engineering human embryos isn’t just illegal, doing so could land you behind bars. Read More >>

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Could the Whole CRISPR Patent Kerfuffle Have Been Completely Avoided?

For the better part of the last three years, the introduction of the most powerful gene editing technology ever invented has been marred by a nasty patent battle. The two groups of scientists involved, each contributing significantly to the future of genetic engineering, are pitted against each other in a bitter contest for glory and fortune. Read More >>

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Stunning Video Is the First to Show CRISPR Editing DNA in Real Time

Despite sounding like an off-brand breakfast cereal, the genetic engineering technique CRISPR has infiltrated the vocabulary of the general public, stoking fierce ethics debates, imaginative renderings of the future and even inspiring a novel and a J.Lo-backed TV series. That’s because CRISPR truly is amazing, allowing human beings to alter genetic code with a level of precision never before achieved. And now there’s actual video footage documenting just how amazing CRISPR really is. Read More >>