maths
The Answer to Life, The Universe, and Everything, Finally Cracked

We all know that 42 is the answer to life, the universe, and everything, thanks to The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy. Now, we also know that it’s the sum of three cubes. Read More >>

wtf
Bizarre Sponsored Talk on ‘Time AI’ Encryption Tech Mocked at Black Hat Conference

Attendees at the Black Hat security conference in Las Vegas, Nevada, booed and ridiculed a sponsored talk on Thursday called “The 2019 Discovery of Quasi-Prime Numbers: What Does This Mean For Encryption?” that touted a bizarre technology called “Time AI”, Motherboard reported on Saturday, with the conference even going so far as to delete material on the talk from its website. Read More >>

science
Sorry, It Looks Like a Researcher Didn’t Crack the Voynich Manuscript After All

Bristol University is backpedalling after publishing an article claiming that one of their scientists helped crack the famously-undecipherable Voynich manuscript, according to a statement. Read More >>

internet
Can You Solve the Creepy Crypto-Puzzle That’s Consuming the Internet?

There’s a sinister cryptographic puzzle sweeping the Internet, with forums abuzz with people trying to decode the clues held within a creepy video. Can you help work out what it all means? Read More >>

giz explains
What’s the Blockchain, and Why Does Bitcoin Depend On It?

It’s going to unshackle us from the oppressive dungeon of fiat currency! But also criminals and rogue cops use it to do nefarious drug stuff! Digital currency is often defined by its volatile hype cycle. And yet its most promising feature is incredibly mundane-sounding: a bookkeeping system called “the blockchain". Read More >>

uncategorized
How to Get Next-Level Cryptography With a Crappy Old Nokia Phone

Remember the Nokia N9? Probably not—but geek points if you do—because it was a smartphone that was DOA and used by pretty much no one. But even a three-year-old smartphone is pretty sophisticated piece of machinery. Using just an N9 and light, physicists have found a way to generate the random numbers algorithms use to encrypt data. Read More >>

hacking
Scientists Hack Cryptography Keys by Simply Touching a Laptop

It sounds like something out of an episode of Spooks: researchers have discovered a way to use touch to decode the cryptography keys that are intended to secure your information. It's as easy as gauging the electric potential coursing through your computer while it's working. Read More >>

history
U-Boats, Spies, and White Magic: The Invention of Wireless Cryptography

The wireless telegraph station in Sayville, New York was one of the most powerful in the world. Constructed by the German company Telefunken in 1912, it served as a transatlantic relay point for diplomatic messages and business communications. It was a beacon among amateur wireless enthusiasts around the United States who could tune their home-made sets to the station's nightly press dispatches. Read More >>

history
Turing’s Nazi Enigma Code-Breaking Secrets Have Been Declassified

Over 70 years ago, father of computer science Alan Turing developed the techniques which enabled quick and efficient decryption of the Nazis' Enigma-scrambled messages. Now, the secrets behind his techniques — hidden away in research documents since the Second World War — have been declassified. Read More >>