wtf
28 Years After Woman ‘Loses’ Contact Lens, Surgeons Find It Embedded in Her Eyelid

A 42-year-old British woman went to eye doctor because her left eyelid started to swell and ache. The doctors noticed her eyelid drooped a bit. But that wasn’t news to the woman — she’d had a heavy lid for a while and was used to it. Read More >>

energy
Government Declares War on Grandma’s Coal Fire

There's something you need to know about coal before reading this in your gas-heated ivory bedsit. There are types of coal, like there are these little egg-shaped lumps of uniform coal that have been processed and, somehow, are allowed to be described as "smokeless" types because they burn cleaner. They're fine. They're safe and you can set them on fire all you like, as long as you do it on something metal and not on the carpet. What's about to be banned is the wrong type of coal. Read More >>

vaping
Government Told to be Nicer to Vapers

A committee of MPs looking into the modern issue of vaping has declared it basically a good thing that should be encouraged, as current thinking suggests there's little evidence that e-cigs are a "gateway" to real old fashioned smoking, and that any option that keeps people away from the old cancerous type of burny-burny cigarettes ought to be embraced and more easily prescribed by doctors. Read More >>

drugs
The Psychedelic Drug DMT Can Simulate a Near-Death Experience, Study Suggests

Not everyone who is close to death—or thinks they are, at least—has a “near-death experience.” But those who do often hallucinate that they leave their bodies, meet otherworldly beings, see bright flashes and tunnels of light, and more. Those who take the psychedelic drug dimethyltryptamine, or DMT— a compound found in the hallucinogenic Amazonian brew known as ayahuasca—experience many of the same things. Read More >>

health
These Medical Miracles Were Supposed to Happen by the Year 2000

Americans who opened the newspaper on January 5, 1961, were greeted with an article by Associated Press science writer John Barbour. He described the futuristic world of the year 2000 and the great medical advances that would be achieved by then. And quite frankly, reading about all of the medical miracles we were supposed to see by now is really bumming me out. Read More >>

health
Superdrug Can Botox That Frown Away in Your Lunch Break

High street magic cream shop Superdrug has expanded its offerings in an extremely modern direction again, this time opening up an in-store mini surgery offering Botox and lip-plumping dermal procedures for women (and indeed probably men nowadays too we add in as an afterthought in case this article gets shared anywhere) who are looking to quickly kick themselves up a few rungs of the perceived societal norm ladder. Read More >>

science
Sleep-Deprived People May Infect You With Loneliness

Not getting enough or the right kind of sleep is notoriously bad for physical health. But a new study out of the University of California, Berkeley suggests that poor sleep can be a nightmare for our social lives too. It just might turn us into lonely outcasts, capable of spreading our misery to others. Read More >>

health
Regularly Inhaling Chemical Gas Apparently Still Not a Great Idea for Your Health

You know how all the smokers switched from analogue cigarettes to new and supposedly healthier digital versions that need batteries and fluids purchasing from the weird shops that are popping up everywhere? Because it's so much healthier? Well, now they say switching from warm smoky air to cold apple-flavoured air isn't all that amazing a change to make, as huffing vapourised chemical compounds gives your lungs an entirely new collection of shit to deal with. Read More >>

health
EXCLUSIVE: Here’s What The New NHS App Will Look Like – And Why It Could Have Been So Much Worse

NHS patients could soon be making appointments, renewing prescriptions and even declaring what sort of end-of-life care they want to receive by using a new app, the details of which Gizmodo UK can exclusively reveal today. Read More >>

science
Probiotic Supplements Might Be Giving Some People ‘Brain Fog’

Given their current popularity, you might assume that probiotics—capsules containing a mix of “good” bacteria that are said to rebalance our gut’s bacterial content—would be perfectly harmless. But a team of gastroenterologists from Augusta University in the US state of Georgia is challenging that assumption. Their recent study is the latest to suggest some people who take probiotics can develop a strange collection of symptoms, including gas, diarrhoea, and “brain fog.” Read More >>

security
Medical Records of 90 Million People Left Vulnerable to Critical Security Flaws

Security researchers have found more than 20 bugs in the world’s most popular open source software for managing medical records. Many of the vulnerabilities were classified as severe, leaving the personal information of an estimated 90 million patients exposed to bad actors. Read More >>

ads
KFC Naughty-Stepped for Advertising a Milkshake Near a School

The protectors of the children and the guardians of the advertising world have given KFC a telling off, after the meat fryer was caught advertising one of its presumably sugar-packed drink treats on a phone box near a school. Read More >>

health
Man Banned From Being a Boss After Awarding Himself Five Stars

A restaurant owner from Derby has been banned from being a restaurant owner – or any other kind of business operator – for five years, after awarding his own restaurant an entirely authority-less five star review and advertising it in local press. Read More >>

health
Women Are More Likely to Die From a Heart Attack If Their Doctor Is Male

There’s a strange gender paradox at the heart of cardiovascular disease. Men are more likely to be diagnosed with a heart condition in their lifetime than women, but diagnosed women are less likely to survive. A study out today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences offers a new theory for this disparity: It suggests that men, who account for the majority of doctors, are worse at treating women heart attack patients than their female counterparts. Read More >>

news
A Top Medical University in Japan Has Been Lowering Women’s Test Scores For Years: Reports

A leading medical university in Japan wanted more male students—so it’s reportedly been lowering the entrance exam scores of female applicants for years. Read More >>