science
Transgender Woman Breastfeeds Her Baby After Experimental Treatment

A medical team from Mount Sinai in New York City is the first to formally report on the details of an experimental therapy that allowed a transgender woman to breastfeed her baby for six weeks. Read More >>

health
New Drugs Extend Lives of Men With Resistant Form Of Prostate Cancer

As a general rule, cancer patients have to worry about the possibility that their cancer will return with a vengeance, no matter how successful their initial treatment course may have been. But some men with prostate cancer are left in an even more nerve-wracking state of uncertainty. Their cancer appears practically frozen, not spreading elsewhere but also not responding any further to treatment. Sadly, some patients will eventually develop a full-blown, incurable, and ultimately fatal cancer. Read More >>

medicine
This Molecule Could Prevent Cancer Patients From Losing Their Lunch

One of the worst side-effects of chemotherapy treatment is the inadvertent damage it causes to the gastrointestinal (GI) system, leading to nausea, vomiting and diarrhoea. While there are short-term treatments available to help deal with these symptoms, oftentimes the damage can lead to chronic GI problems. Now, researchers at the University of Pittsburgh say they’ve found a way to short circuit the molecular pathway that sparks this gut damage in the first place. Read More >>

medicine
Report: Yale Dental Students, Staff Took Selfie With Severed Heads

Dental school grad students and a University of Connecticut orthodontics professor took a selfie “with two severed heads used for medical research at a training workshop at Yale University” in 2017, the Associated Press reported on Monday. Read More >>

science
Scientists Slammed for Synthesising a Smallpox-Like Virus in the Lab

The dreaded smallpox virus was eradicated more than 40 years ago, but the threat of its return still looms. In an effort to develop a safer vaccine substitute, Canadian researchers have resurrected a close relative—the extinct horsepox virus—from scratch. Critics say the exercise was pointless, and because the results were published in an open access journal, they fear the smallpox virus can now be manufactured by virtually anybody—terrorists included. Read More >>

health
New AI System Predicts How Long Patients Will Live With Startling Accuracy

By using an artificially intelligent algorithm to predict patient mortality, a research team from Stanford University is hoping to improve the timing of end-of-life care for critically ill patients. In tests, the system proved eerily accurate, correctly predicting mortality outcomes in 90 per cent of cases. But while the system is able to predict when a patient might die, it still cannot tell doctors how it came to its conclusion. Read More >>

science
A Common Sweetener May Be Worsening the Spread of These Deadly Bacteria

Stool transplants are exactly what they sound like: moving poo from a healthy person into a sick person, perhaps via a pill or an enema. I bring this up because most people cringe at the idea—but they’re a treatment proven effective for some antibiotic-resistant infections caused by the Clostridium difficile, or C. diff bacteria, which kill thousands of Brits per year. A common sweetener may be worsening these C. diff infections. Read More >>

health
Drug Company Allegedly Bribed Doctors to Sell Its Powerful Opiod Spray

The US state of North Carolina is suing a pharmaceutical manufacturer for allegedly bribing doctors and defrauding insurers in order to sell more of its powerful fentanyl spray, fanning the flames of an opioid crisis that has millions addicted and is shortening lifespans. Read More >>

science
We Spoke With the Italian Woman Who Can’t Feel Pain 

Earlier this month, scientists discussed a new syndrome, “Marsili syndrome,” a rare disorder in which people feel significantly less pain than others—so little pain, in fact, they they can break bones without noticing. As far as scientists can tell, there’s only one family that has Marsili syndrome: The Marsili family in Italy. Read More >>

science
Man Had So Many Prostate Orgasms He Couldn’t Stop, According to New Paper

One 63-year-old man had so many prostate orgasms that he couldn’t stop. Read More >>

science
Ketamine Relieved Suicidal Thoughts Within Hours in Hospital Study

When it comes to preventing suicide, true breakthroughs are hard to come by, and although there are many drugs and therapy approaches available for people with depression, less than half of people achieve any sustained remission. In recent years, though, doctors have found convincing evidence that low doses of ketamine, a drug used by doctors and veterinarians for its anaesthetic properties and by sensation-seekers for its psychedelic effects, might represent a genuine advance in treating depression. A new study published in the American Journal of Psychiatry suggests that ketamine could also be effective as a fast-acting treatment to prevent suicide. Read More >>

technology
AI Will Turn Regular Fitness Trackers Into Potentially Life-Saving Medical Devices

When the Food and Drug Administration recently announced that it had approved the first-ever medical accessory for the Apple Watch—a wearable EKG monitor made by the medtech company AliveCor—it was big news. Apple has increasingly invested in health tech, eyeing it as a market where the Watch might hit big. The FDA announcement suggested that bet might be paying off. Read More >>

health
The Government’s Launched its Opt-Out Organ Donation Consultation Online

Back in October the government announced that it would be holding a consultation about the topic of an opt-out organ donation system, similar to the system currently in place in Wales and the one planned for Scotland. Now that consultation has made its way online, so that the general public can have their say. Read More >>

science
Woman Born Without Uterus Gives Birth in Medical Milestone

A healthy baby has been born at a Dallas, Texas hospital to a mother who received a uterus transplant. It’s a medical first for the United States, and an important milestone in the battle against infertility. Read More >>

science
Unconscious Patient With ‘Do Not Resuscitate’ Tattoo Causes Ethical Conundrum at Hospital

When an unresponsive patient arrived at a Florida hospital ER, the medical staff was taken aback upon discovering the words “DO NOT RESUSCITATE” tattooed onto the man’s chest—with the word “NOT” underlined and with his signature beneath it. Confused and alarmed, the medical staff chose to ignore the apparent DNR request—but not without alerting the hospital’s ethics team, who had a different take on the matter. Read More >>