science
Model Brains-on-a-Chip Reveal the Physics of Brain Folding

Brains fold in on themselves as they grow. That’s just what they do. How and why they do it is a different story, and studying it requires some pretty interesting science. Science like growing simple mini-brains on a chip under a microscope. Read More >>

space
New Results Challenge Basic Ideas of Supermassive Black Holes

Galaxies have supermassive black holes at their centres—our Milky Way, for example, has its own 4-million-solar-mass one, Sagittarius A*. Some astronomers have previously thought that there’s a simple relationship between the galaxy’s size, the black hole’s mass, and how much light the black hole spits out while it eats up the things surrounding it. But a pair of papers studying the biggest star-eating behemoths imaginable seems to bust up that assumption. Read More >>

space
Falcon Heavy May Have Drastically Increased the Number of Asteroids We Can Mine

Asteroid mining is about more than just heading up into space and bringing back a rock full of platinum—you actually need to land something on just the right asteroid. Read More >>

space
There’s Only the Tiniest Chance That Musk’s Tesla Will Crash Back to Earth, but We’ll Take it

By now it’s old news—somewhere in space, there’s a red Tesla Roadster with a spacesuit-wearing dummy in the passenger’s seat. It probably doesn’t drive anymore, and NASA has officially listed it as a celestial object. Read More >>

science
New Silicon Chip-Based Quantum Computer Passes Major Test 

There’s another quantum computer to keep track of in this Wild West era of quantum computing research we’re in. And it uses some parts you might already be familiar with. Read More >>

science
Scientists Have No Idea Why This Enriched Uranium Particle Was Floating Above Alaska

On August 3, 2016, seven kilometres above Alaska’s Aleutian Islands, a research plane captured something mysterious: an atmospheric aerosol particle enriched with the kind of uranium used in nuclear fuel and bombs. Read More >>

photography
Picture of Single Trapped Atom Wins UK Science Photography Prize

Zoom in close on the centre of the picture above, and you can spot something you perhaps never thought you’d be able to see: a single atom. Here is a close-up if you’re having trouble: Read More >>

science
Portable Atomic Clock Makes First Measurement

With a new, “portable” atomic clock, scientists are measuring not what time it is but changes to time itself. Read More >>

science
Scientists Are Hunting for the ‘Dark Photon’—a Portal to the Dark Universe

It appears that the Universe is full of dark matter—around six times more of it than there is regular matter. It has obvious visible effects, like the way it bends light from distant galaxies. Despite dedicated searches, no signs of a dark matter particle explaining these effects have turned up. Read More >>

science
Experimenters Observe Strange Magnetic Phenomenon First Predicted in the 1930s

Scientists have experimentally observed a physical concept that was first theorised in 1931 for the first time—one that could result in important applications in quantum computing and even the study of string theory. Maybe. Read More >>

science
Heaviest Element Should Completely Subvert the Rules of High School Chemistry

At the bottom right-hand corner of the periodic table sits a fantasy world. Until recently, these elusive elements’ names were just fancy translations of their numbers. They’re enormous and can only be produced in the lab. They only stick around for a few seconds at most before radioactively decaying into smaller elements. Read More >>

space
Scientists Observe Incredible New Kind of Ice Thought to Exist in Uranus’ Centre

Here is an ice cube you do not want to put in your Diet Coke: A solid lattice of oxygen atoms with protons whizzing around inside of it. This ice is not normal on Earth, but might be elsewhere. And scientists have created it in a lab. Read More >>

space
Space-Based Gravitational Wave Observatory Passes Huge Test

Gravitational waves may be the most exciting thing in astronomy right now, but there are only so many things in space that scientists can study with Earth-based gravitational wave detectors. An incredible new test has demonstrated that space-based detectors could become a reality, which could open our ears to entirely new sources of gravitational waves. Read More >>

science
Physicists Spot Evidence of ‘Odderon’ First Predicted in The 1970s

Scientists have uncovered some preliminary evidence for a nuclear physics effect first predicted back in the 1970s. The physics universe you’re about to enter into in order to understand it is especially mind-bending. Read More >>

science
Synchronised Galactic Orbit Challenges Our Best Theory of How the Universe Works

Scientists thought the Milky Way and Andromeda galaxies were unique: They’ve got rings of smaller dwarf galaxies orbiting in what seems to be a synchronised fashion. But when a team of scientists recently looked at another galaxy, they realised it also seemed to shepherd a flock of dwarfs in a strange, synchronised dance. That’s not supposed to happen. Read More >>