space
Good News: The Milky Way May Not be Devoured by Andromeda Galaxy After All

The closest galaxy to our own is the majestic Andromeda galaxy: a collection of a trillion stars located a “mere” 2 million light years away. New research suggests that, contrary to previous estimates, this galaxy isn’t much bigger than the Milky Way, and is practically our twin. This means our galaxy won’t be completely consumed when the two galaxies collide in five billion years. Read More >>

science
Secrets of The Cuttlefish’s Uncanny Camouflage Abilities Revealed

Octopus, squid, and cuttlefish can change their skin’s colours, patterns, and textures in ways not seen anywhere else in the animal kingdom. You see what looks to be a clump of seaweed, and then it suddenly springs to life in the form of a retreating cephalopod. The changing of skin texture is a particularly impressive skill—one that marine biologists are now a step closer to understanding. Read More >>

health
Bed Bugs Are Pooping Histamine Into Our Homes—And Possibly Making Us Sick

There are few living things on earth that can set our nerves more on edge than the aptly named bed bug (Cimex lectularius). Even if you’ve never had the displeasure of being their unwilling blood bank, you probably know someone who has. Since at least the 1990s, bed bugs have started to resist the pesticides we’ve long used against them and stormed back from near-extinction to once again become a common household pest. Read More >>

space
When Will We Finally Find a Truly Earth-Like Exoplanet?

There are many definitions of an Earth-like exoplanet. Some say it’s a planet that orbits a star at just the right distance for liquid water to exist on its surface. Some say it’s a rocky planet, like ours. But determining if an exoplanet is truly habitable requires actually figuring out what’s on the planet. Read More >>

science
Scientists Successfully Test a Vaccine in Mice That Could Prevent Many Cancers

Even under the best of circumstances, cancer treatment can be an excruciating, costly ordeal that tragically doesn’t even work sometimes. In light of that reality, scientists and doctors have long searched for a way to proactively head off the problem using a vaccine. One potential approach to a cancer vaccine, highlighted in a new study published Thursday in Cell Stem Cell, might involve using our own reprogrammed stem cells to better train the immune system against several—and maybe even all—types of cancers. Read More >>

science
CRISPR’s Pioneers Find a Way to Use It as a Glowing Virus Detector

CRISPR is at this point well-known for its powerful ability to genetically engineer DNA, but more and more often scientists are turning to CRISPR for other tasks as well. Read More >>

robots
Freaky Flea-Like Robots Could One Day Flip and Tumble Inside Your Body

These tiny, flipping microbots, currently being developed by researchers at Purdue University, could one day deliver drugs directly inside the body. The magnetically propelled bots are no wider than a pinhead. Read More >>

science
These Asexual Animals Don’t Need Love

Does all the stress of finding a partner get you down? Do you ever wish you could just start a family of your own, with kids that looked just like you, but without all of the trouble of finding another individual to mix sex cells with? Read More >>

star trek
Fake Research Paper Based on Star Trek: Voyager’s Worst Episode Was Published by a Scientific Journal

“Threshold” is one of the most infamous Star Trek episodes ever. You know what’ we’re talking about—the one with Warp 10 and the weird evolved amphibians. Well, it was also the recent subject of a fake scientific research paper submitted in a test to expose the ever-growing problem of “predatory” scientific journals. Read More >>

spacex
SpaceX’s Ambitious Internet Satellite Project Is Set to Launch This Weekend

With the inaugural launch of the super-powerful Falcon Heavy rocket now in the books, SpaceX CEO Elon Musk is ready to set his sights on an ambitious project known as Starlink. On Saturday, SpaceX will launch two experimental mini-satellites—the first batch of what Musk hopes will eventually comprise a 4,000-satellite constellation providing low-cost internet around the globe. Read More >>

space
Neptune’s Stinky Dark Vortex is Fading Away Like a Bad Fart

In 2015, the Hubble Space Telescope detected a strange feature in the skies over Neptune—a swirling dark vortex the size of China. Packing copious amounts of hydrogen sulphide—the chemical ingredient that gives farts their awful smell—this storm is not behaving as astronomers predicted, with the latest results suggesting the dark vortex is dying. Read More >>

science
There’s Already a Leather Coaster to Protect Your Furniture From the HomePod

It only took one day—one freaking day!!—for someone to capitalise on the bizarre news that Apple’s £330 HomePod, the speaker that isn’t so smart but sounds pretty great, might wreck your wood furniture. That someone is gadget accessories maker Pad and Quill and we are just as blown away/totally unsurprised as you are. Read More >>

crispr
Scientists Made a ‘Black Box’ for Recording Data From Human Cells

The human body is made up of trillions and trillions cells. And of those trillions of cells, there are hundreds of different types, each with its own specific function, from forming your tissue and organs to reproduction and fighting off infections. They provide structure for the body, take in nutrients, and create energy. Basically, it’s all about the cell. Read More >>

winter olympics
Why the Winter Olympics Has Less Doping Than the Summer Olympics

Russia was banned from competing in the Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, a sweeping punishment for its brazen state-sponsored doping programme, exposed in 2016. But even with the added scrutiny of athletes in 2018, the percentage of athletes using banned substances in Pyeongchang is probably lower than it was in Rio in 2016, and than it will be in Tokyo in 2020. Doping—throughout the history of the Olympics—tends to happens more in the Summer Games than in the Winter Games. Read More >>

space
There’s Only the Tiniest Chance That Musk’s Tesla Will Crash Back to Earth, but We’ll Take it

By now it’s old news—somewhere in space, there’s a red Tesla Roadster with a spacesuit-wearing dummy in the passenger’s seat. It probably doesn’t drive anymore, and NASA has officially listed it as a celestial object. Read More >>